Развитие английского языка

История английского языка

Как появился, развивался и как происходил процесс становления английского языка.Начнем с того, что исторически английский язык развивался совместно с историей Англии...

Глоссарии - Американские идиомы: T


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To append; add. We were about to sign the contract when we discovered that the lawyer had tacked on a codicil that was not acceptable to us.
или , The end, farthest to the rear, last in line, nearest the bottom, or least important. John was at the tail end of his class. Mary's part in the play came at the tag end, and she got bored waiting. Bill waited at the crossing for the tag end of a freight to go by.
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State of feeling beaten, ashamed, or very obedient, as after a scolding or a whipping. The army sent the enemy home with their tails between their legs. The boys on the team had boasted they would win the tournament, but they went home with their tails between their legs. (So called because a beaten dog usually puts his tail down between his legs and slinks away.)
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The rear red light of a car. My father was fined $15 for driving without a taillight.
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Said of situations in which a minor part is in control of the whole. He is just a minor employee at the firm, yet he gives everyone orders, a case of the tail wagging the dog.
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, To accept a poorer or lower position; be second to something or someone else. During the war all manufacturing had to take a back seat to military needs. She does not have to take a back seat to any singer alive. : .
, To come to financial ruin. Boy, did we ever take a bath on that merger with Brown & Brown, Inc.
To stand up or come on a stage to be clapped for or praised for success. The audience shouted for the author of the play to take a bow. The basketball team should take a bow for fine work this season.
To have a brief rest period during the course of one's work. "You've worked hard. It's time to take a break," the boss said.
To accept the risk of failure or loss. We will take a chance on the weather and have the party outdoors.
To try doing something. It was a difficult challenge to reorganize our antiquated campus, but the resident architect decided to take a crack at it.
To attack verbally; offend; denigrate. If you keep taking digs at me all the time, our relationship will be a short one.
1) To have doubts about; feel unsure or anxious about. Tom took a dim view of his chances of passing the exam. Betty hoped to go on a picnic, but she took a dim view of the weather. 2) To be against; disapprove. John's father took a dim view of his wanting to borrow the car. The teacher took a dim view of the class's behavior.
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1) To indulge in alcoholic drinks. Aunt Liz doesn't really drink; she just takes a drop every now and then. 2. To lose value; decrease in price. Stocks took a big drop yesterday due to the international crisis.
1) To make good use of. The cat took advantage of the high grass to creep up on the bird. Jean took advantage of the lunch hour to finish her homework. 2) To treat (someone) unfairly for your own gain or help; make unfair use of. He took advantage of his friend's kindness. The little children did not know how much to pay for the candy, and Ralph took advantage of them. : .
To be like because of family relationship; to have the same looks or ways as (a parent or ancestor). He takes after his father in mathematical ability. She takes after her father's side of the family in looks. : .
To become fond of; cultivate a predilection for. Aunt Hermione has taken a fancy to antique furniture.
To fall heavily. I took a nasty flop on the ice-covered sidewalk.
To get ready to hit, throw at, or shoot at by sighting carefully. When the captain orders "Take aim," raise your gun to your shoulder and sight along the barrel at the target. Before the hunter could take aim, the deer jumped out of sight.
To assist in the direction of; participate. The University Faculty Club decided to take a hand in helping the recent refugees.
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To understand an allusion or a suggestion and behave accordingly. "I don't like people who smoke," she said. "Can't you take a hint and either quit smoking or seeing me?"
Accept in good spirit some derision directed at oneself. My brother has a good sense of humor when teasing others, but he cannot take a joke on himself.
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To alleviate one's fatigue by sitting down during some taxing work. "You've been standing there for hours, Jake," John said. "Why don't you take a load off your feet?"
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или To become offended due to a misunderstanding. "I hope you won't take it amiss," the boss said to Jane, "that I find you irresistibly attractive."
To start a new course; decide upon a new direction. The company took a new turn under Jack's directorship.
To plummet; fall sharply. The stock market took a nose dive after the news of the President's heart attack.
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To dismantle; disassemble. Boys like taking radios and watches apart, but they seldom know how to put them back together again.
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, To leave hurriedly; run out or away; desert, flee. All the gang except one had taken a powder when the police arrived.
или или To try to hit (someone) with the fist; swing or strike at; attack with the fists. Bob was very angry and suddenly he took a punch at Fred. Johnny knocked my hat off, so I took a poke at him. I felt like taking a sock at Joe, but I kept my temper.
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, To have or show a quick liking for. He took a shine to his new teacher the very first day. : .
To try casually; attempt to do. "Can you handle all these new book orders?" Tom asked. "I haven't done it before," Sally replied, "but I can sure take a shot at it."
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To fall down; tip over. During the harsh winter, when the sidewalk is covered with ice, many people take a spill.
To believe everything (someone) says; to act on what is said. If you say you don't want this coat, I'll take you at your word and throw it away. When the king said he wished to be rid of his advisor, a friend took him at his word and murdered the councillor.
To assert one's point. of view; declare one's position. It is time for American society to take a stand against crime.
To become different; change. Mary's fever suddenly took a bad turn. The story took an odd turn. Often used with "for the better" or "for the worse". In the afternoon the weather took a turn for the better. Suddenly the battle took a turn for the worse.
To start improving; start to get better. Aunt Hermione was very ill for a long time, but last week she suddenly took a turn for the better.
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To change or deny something offered, promised, or stated; admit to making a wrong statement. I take back my offer to buy the house now that I've had a good look at it. I want you to take back the unkind things you said about Kenneth.
1) To capture by a sudden or very bold attack. The army did not hesitate. They took the town by storm. 2) To win the favor or liking of; make (a group of people) like or believe you. The comic took the audience by storm. John gave Jane so much attention that he took her by storm, and she said she would marry him. : .
1) To appear in front of someone suddenly or to suddenly discover him before he discovers you; come before (someone) is ready; appear before (someone) unexpectedly. The policeman took the burglar by surprise as he opened the window. When Mrs. Green's dinner guests came half an hour early, they took her by surprise. 2) To fill with surprise or amazement; astonish. Ellen was taken by surprise when the birthday cake was brought in. When our teacher quit in the middle of the year to work for the government, it took us all by surprise.
1) To assert authority over a person. Tim's mother took him by the scruff and told him to get cleaned up. 2) To punish a person. The boss took us by the scruff when he found us chatting idly by the coffee machine. 3) To assume firm control over a job or a situation that has been causing some difficulty. Someone had better take the post office by the scruff; there are too many customer complaints pouring in.
To be careful; use wisdom or caution. Take care that you don't spill that coffee! We must take care to let nobody hear about this.
1) To attend to; supply the needs of. She stayed home to take care of the baby. : , : . 2) To deal with; do what is needed with. I will take care of that letter. The coach told Jim to take care of the opposing player. : .
To begin to lead or control; take control or responsibility; undertake the care or management (of persons or things). When Mrs. Jackson was in the hospital, her sister took charge of the Jackson children until Mrs. Jackson could care for them. The child care class gave a party for the nursery children, and Mary took charge of the games. John was elected the new president of the club and took charge at the next meeting. Bob is a natural leader, and can take charge in an emergency. : .
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To seek shelter or protection. The rain began so suddenly that we had to take cover in a doorway.
1) To write or record (what is said). I will tell you how to get to the place; you had better take it down. 2) To pull to pieces; take apart. It will be a big job to take that tree down. In the evening the campers put up a tent, and the next morning they took it down. 3) To reduce the pride or spirit of; humble. Bob thought he was a good wrestler, but Henry took him down. : .
или , To make (someone) less proud or sure of himself. The team was feeling proud of its record, but last week the boys were taken down a peg by a bad defeat.
1) To have an unexpected or intended result; cause a change. It was nearly an hour before the sleeping pill took effect. 2) To become lawfully right, or operative. The new tax law will not take effect until January.
To speak against; find fault with; be displeased or angered by; criticize. There was nothing in the speech that you could take exception to. Did she take exception to my remarks about her cooking.
To take a five-minute break during some work or theatrical rehearsal. "All right, everyone," the director cried. "Let's take five."
To suppose to be; mistake for. Do you take me for a fool? At first sight you would take him for a football player, not a poet.
, 1) To take out in a car intending to murder. The gang leader decided that the informer must be taken for a ride. 2) To play a trick on; fool. The girls told Linda that a movie star was visiting the school, but she did not believe them; she thought they were taking her for a ride. : . 3) To take unfair advantage of; fool for your own gain. His girlfriend really took him for a ride before he stopped dating her.
1) To suppose or understand to be true. Mr. Harper took for granted that the invitation included his wife. A teacher cannot take it for granted that students always do their homework. : . 2) To accept or become used to (something) without noticing especially or saying anything. George took for granted all that his parents did for him. No girl likes to have her boyfriend take her for granted; instead, he should always try to make her like him better.
To leave secretly; abscond. The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave. While the Smith family was in Europe, the house-sitter packed up all the silver and took French leave. : .
To be encouraged; feel braver and want to try. The men took heart from their leader's words and went on to win the battle. When we are in trouble we can take heart from the fact that things often seem worse than they are. : .
, To pay attention; watch or listen carefully; notice. Take heed not to spill coffee on the rug.
To grasp. The old man tried to keep himself from falling down the stairs, but there was no railing to take hold of.
или To become sick. Father took sick just before his birthday. — Used in the passive with the same meaning. The man was taken ill on the train.
1) To include. The country's boundaries were changed to fake in a piece of land beyond the river. The class of mammals takes in nearly all warm-blooded animals except the birds. 2) To go and see; visit. The students decided to take in a movie while they were in town. We planned to take in Niagara Palls and Yellowstone Park on our trip. 3) To make smaller. This waistband is too big; it must be taken in about an inch. They had to take in some sail to keep the ship from turning over in the storm. 4) To grasp with the mind; understand. He didn't take in what he read because his mind was on something else. He took in the situation at a glance. 5a) To deceive; cheat; fool. The teacher was taken in by the boy's innocent manner. : . 5b) To accept without question; believe. The magician did many tricks, and the children took it all in. 6a) To receive; get. The senior class held a dance to make money and took in over a hundred dollars. 6b) Let come in; admit. The farmer took in the lost travelers for the night. When her husband died, Mrs. Smith took in boarders. 7) To see or hear with interest; pay close attention to, When Bill told about his adventures, the other boys took it all in.
To meet happenings without too much surprise; accept good or bad luck and go on. He learned to take disappointments in stride.
To take charge of; lead; conduct. Brian and Kate took a group of children in tow when they went to see the circus.
To remember and understand while judging someone or something; consider. How much time will we need to get to the lake? You have to take the bad road into account. His acting in the play was remarkable, taking into account his youth and inexperience. : , : .
To be openly against; speak against; disagree with. He thought his boss was wrong but was afraid to take issue with him on the matter.
1) To get an idea or impression; understand from what is said or done. — Usually used with "I". I take it from your silence that you don't want to go. 2) To bear trouble, hard work, criticism; not give up or weaken. Henry could criticize and tease other boys, but he couldn't take it himself. Bob lost his job and his girl in the same week, and we all admired the way he took it.
To absorb completely; listen attentively. Bill's piano music filled the room and we took it all in with admiration.
, , You're on; it's your turn; you're next. And here comes that wonderful comedian, Bob Hope. The announcer said, "Take it away. Bob."
, 1) or или To go or act slowly, carefully, and gently. — Often used with "on". Take it easy. The roads are icy. "Go easy," said Billy to the other boys carrying the table down the stairs. "Take it easy on John and don't scold him too much," said Mrs. Jones to Mr. Jones. Go easy on the cake. There isn't much left. 2) or To avoid hard work or worry; have an easy time; live in comfort. The doctor said that Bob would have to take things easy for awhile after he had his tonsils out. Barbara likes to take it easy. Grandfather will retire from his job next year and take things easy. Mr. Wilson has just made a lot of money and can take things easy now.
, To start again from the beginning. The conductor said, "We must try it once again. Take it from the top and watch my baton."
или To get a sudden idea; decide without thinking. The boy suddenly took it into his head to leave school and get a job. Grandmother keeps a bag packed so that she can go visiting whenever she takes a notion.
, 1) To be badly beaten or hurt. Our football team really took it on the chin today. They are all bumps and bruises. Mother and I took it on the chin in the card game. 2) To accept without complaint something bad that happens to you; accept trouble or defeat calmly. A good football player can take it on the chin when his team loses.
, To accept something without change or refuse it; decide yes or no. — Often used like a command. He said the price of the house was $10,000, take it or leave it.
, To be unpleasant or unkind to (someone) because you are angry or upset; get rid of upset feelings by being mean to. — Often used with the name of the feeling instead of "it." The teacher was angry and took it out on the class. Bob was angry because Father would not let him use the car, and he took it out on his little brother.
To cause loss or damage. The bombs had taken their toll on the little town. The budget cut took its toll of teachers.
To be pleased by; like. — Usually used in negative, interrogative, and conditional sentences. He doesn't take kindly to any suggestions about running his business. Will your father take kindly to the idea of your leaving college?
I. To abandon, go away from, or become separated from. — Usually used in the phrase "take leave of one's senses". Come down from the roof, Billy! Have you taken leave of your senses? 2) : .
To go mad; become crazy. "Have you taken leave of your senses? "Jake cried, when he saw Andy swallow a live goldfish.
To act toward in too close or friendly a manner; use as you would use a close friend or something of your own. Mary would not let any boy take liberties with her. Bill took liberties with Tom's bicycle. : .
To accept something without defense or protest. If you take such insults lying down, you will only encourage more of the same.
также Unpleasantly surprised; suddenly puzzled or shocked. When he came to pay for his dinner he was taken aback to find that he had left his wallet at home.
или To be impressed by; intrigued by. Ned was much taken by the elegance of Sophie's manners.
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или 1) To look carefully at; pay close attention to; observe well. A detective is trained to take note of people and things. 2) To notice and act in response; pay attention. Two boys were talking together in the back of the room but the teacher took no notice of them. The principal thanked everyone who helped in the program, and took note of the decorations made by the art class.
To promise to tell the truth or to do some task honestly, calling on God or some person or thing as a witness. Mary took her oath that she did not steal the watch. John took oath that he would fill the office of president faithfully.
1) Departure of an airplane; the act of becoming airborne. The nervous passenger was relieved that we had such a wonderfully smooth takeoff. 2) Imitation; a parody. Vaughn Meader used to do a wonderful takeoff on President Kennedy's speech.
1a) To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. The dog took off after a rabbit. : . 1b) To go away; leave. The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store. 2) To leave on a flight, begin going up. A helicopter is able to take off and land straight up or down. 3) To imitate amusingly; copy another person's habitual actions or speech. He made a career of taking off famous people for nightclub audiences. At the party, Charlie took off the principal and some of the teachers. 4) To take (time) to be absent from work. When his wife was sick he took off from work. Bill was tired out so he took the day off.
To give honor, praise, and respect to. He is my enemy, but I take off my hat to him for his courage. : .
To become indignant; become angry. Why do you always take offense at everything I say?
1) To abdicate one's responsibility of a person or matter. "I am herewith taking my hand off your affairs," Lou's father said. "See how you succeed on your own." 2) To buy; relieve someone of something. He offered to take my old car off my hands for $350.
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1) To receive for carrying; be loaded with. A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale. The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on. 2) To begin to have (the look of); take (the appearance of). Others joined the fistfight until it took on the look of a riot. After the students put up Christmas decorations, the classroom took on a holiday appearance. 3a) To give a job to; hire; employ. The factory has opened and is beginning to take on new workers. : . 3b) To accept in business or a contest. The big man took on two opponents at once. After his father died, Bill took on the management of the factory. We knew their football team was bigger and stronger, but we took them on anyway and beat them. 4) To show great excitement, grief, or anger. At the news of her husband's death she took on like a madwoman. : .
To naively lend credence to what one tells one. It's a bad idea to take street vendors at their word in large, crowded cities.
To surprise greatly; impress very much; leave speechless with surprise or wonder or delight; astonish. The sunset is so beautiful it takes our breath away. His refusal was so unexpected it took my breath away. : .
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или , To say good-bye and leave. He stayed on after most of the guests had taken their leave. The messenger bowed and took leave of the queen.
The end of school in June is a time of leave-taking.
To face great danger or take great risk. Driving that car with those worn tires would be taking your life in your hands. He took his life in his hands when he tried to capture the wild horse.
или To judge the character, quality, or nature of; try to guess about something — how hard or easy, dangerous or safe, good or bad, etc. The boxers sparred for a while taking each other's measure. John took the measure of the cliff before he climbed it. : .
To accept punishment without complaining. The boy said he was sorry he broke the window and was ready to take his medicine. : .
1) To call upon (God) as a witness to your truth or honesty when you are lying; swear by (God) untruthfully. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain. 2) To talk about a person or mention his name. "Did I hear someone taking my name in vain?" asked Bill as he joined his friends.
To avoid haste; act in an unhurried way. He liked to take his time over breakfast. It is better to take your time at this job than to hurry and make mistakes.
To believe one's promise. Herb took Eric's word when he promised to pay up his debt.
To lend credence to something due to one's confidence in the source, rather than based on evidence. One should never take on faith what one hears about Washington politics.
или 1) To accept as a duty or responsibility. He took it on himself to see that the packages were delivered. 2) To assume wrongfully or without permission as a right or privilege. You should not have taken it upon yourself to accept the invitation for the whole family.
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To gracefully accept criticism. It's good to be able to tell people what they do wrong, but it is equally important to be able to take it on the chin when they tell you what you have done wrong.
1) To ask for and fill in. Mary and John took out a marriage license. 2) To begin to run. When the window broke, the boys took out in all directions. When the wind blew the man's hat off, Charlie took out after it. : .
To start pursuing one. The watchdog took out after the burglars.
To vent one's sadness, frustration, or anger on someone who is usually innocent of the problem at hand. "Why are you always taking out your frustrations on me?" Jane asked Tom, when he slammed the door.
An order in a restaurant that one does not eat on the premises, but takes home. The new Chinese restaurant on the corner sells nice take-out orders.
1a) To take control or possession of. He expects to take over the business when his father retires. 1b) To take charge or responsibility. The airplane pilot fainted and his co-pilot had to take over. 2) To borrow, imitate, or adopt. The Japanese have taken over many European ways of life.
To do something very carefully and thoroughly. She had taken pains to see that her guests had everything that they could possibly want. She always takes pains with her appearance.
To have a part or share; join. Jim saw the new boy watching the game and asked him to take part. The Swiss did not take part in the two World Wars.
также To feel sympathy or pity and do something for. Mary took pity on the orphan kittens. The farmer took pity upon the campers, and let them stay in his barn during the rain.
To happen; occur. The accident took place only a block from his home. The action of the play takes place in ancient Rome. The dance will take place after the graduation exercises. : .
To share as a guest an everyday meal without special preparation. You are welcome to stay for dinner if you will take potluck. They were about to have lunch when he phoned and they asked him to take potluck with them.
1) To form roots so as to be able to live and grow. We hope the transplanted apple trees will take root. 2) To be accepted; to be adopted; to live and succeed in a new place. Many European customs failed to take root in the New World. The immigrants to our country took root and began to think of themselves as Native Americans.
To grow or develop into a certain fixed form. Plans for our vacation are beginning to take shape. Their new home took shape as the weeks went by. : .
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To join one group against another in a debate or quarrel. Switzerland refused to take sides in the two World Wars. Tom wanted to go fishing. Dick wanted to take a hike. Bob took sides with Tom so they all went fishing. : , : .
, 1) To cheat or swindle someone. Poor Joe Catwallender was taken for a ride. 2) To kill someone after kidnapping. The criminals took the man for a ride.
To begin to make plans or arrangements; make preparations; give orders. — Usually used with "to" and an infinitive. The city is taking steps to replace its streetcars with busses.
1) To count exactly the items of merchandise or supplies in stock; take inventory. The grocery store took stock every week on Monday mornings. 2) To study carefully a situation, or a number of possibilities or opportunities. During the battle the commander paused to take stock of the situation. : .
, To have faith in; trust; believe. — Usually used in the negative. He took no stock in the idea that women were better cooks than men. They took little or no stock in the boy's story that he had lost the money. Do you take any stock in the gossip about Joan?
также To have your own way; take charge of things; take control of something. When Mary wanted something, she was likely to take the bit in her teeth and her parents could do nothing with her. : .
To take away or not give your rightful support, especially through selfish pleasure. She accused her husband of drinking and gambling — taking bread out of his children's mouths.
, To take definite action and not care about risks; act bravely in a difficulty. He decided to take the bull by the horns and demand a raise in salary even though it might cost him his job. : .
, 1) To take the first prize; be the best; rank first. Mr. Jones takes the cake as a storyteller. 2. To be the limit; to be the worst; have a lot of nerve; be a very rude, bold, or surprising action. I let Jack borrow my baseball and he never gave it back. Doesn't that take the cake? For being absent-minded, Mr. Smith takes the cake. : .
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также To lessen, weaken, soften or make dull. Eating a candy bar before dinner has taken the edge off Becky's appetite. Bob was sorry for hurting Tom and that took the edge off Tom's anger. A headache took the edge off Dick's pleasure in the movie.
, 1) Taking refuge behind the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States which guarantees any witness the right not to incriminate himself while testifying at a trial. Alger Hiss took the Fifth when asked whether he was a member of the Communist Party. 2) Not to answer any question in an informal setting. Have you been married before? — I take the Fifth.
To get up and make a speech in a meeting. The audience became very attentive the moment the president took the floor.
To protect one's supposed rights or punish a suspected wrongdoer without reference to a court. — An overused expression. When the men of the settlement caught the suspected murderer, they took the law into their own hands and hanged him to a tree. His farm was going to be sold for taxes, but he took the law into his own hands and drove the sheriff away with a shotgun. : .
1) To let out in the open; divulge. It's about time to take the lid off the question of how many prisoners of war are still in enemy hands. 2) To start to face an issue. "The best way to deal with your divorce," the doctor said to Fran, "is to take the lid off of it." : .
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To make oneself the attacking party. After many months of preparation, the freedom fighters were ready to take the offensive. Contrast .
To swear to give up drinking, smoking, or using drugs. Gary finally took the pledge and he has kept it thus far.
To take a fatal or decisive step; venture. When I asked Don when he and Melissa were going to get married, he answered that they'll take the plunge in September.
, To receive punishment; to be accused and punished. All of the boys took apples, but only John took the rap. Joe took the burglary rap for his brother and went to prison for two years.
To assume one's position in the witness box during a trial. The judge asked the defendant to take the stand.
, 1) To make (someone) feel weak or tired. The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn't feel like doing a thing. The cross-country run took all the starch out of the boys. 2) : .
или To travel around to different places making political speeches. The men running for president took to the stump to attract votes.
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To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one. Dick took the wind out of Bob's sails by showing him where he was wrong. : .
To say what another is just going to say; to put another's thought into words. "Let's go to the beach tomorrow." "You took the words right out of my mouth; I was thinking of that." I was going to suggest a movie, but she took the words out of my mouth and said she would like to see one.
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1) To go to or into; get yourself quickly to. — Often used in the imperative. Take to the hills! The bandits are coming! We took to the woods during the day so no one would see us. Take to the boats! The ship is sinking. We stopped at a hotel for the night but took to the road again the next morning. 2) To begin the work or job of; make a habit of. He took to repairing watches in his spare time. She took to knitting when she got older. Grandfather took to smoking cigars when he was young and he still smokes them. Uncle Willie took to drink while he was a sailor. The cat took to jumping on the table at mealtime. 3) To learn easily; do well at. Father tried to teach John to swim, but John didn't take to it. Mary takes to mathematics like a duck takes to water. 4) To like at first meeting; be pleased by or attracted to; accept quickly. Our dog always takes to children quickly. Mary didn't take kindly to the new rule that her mother made of being home at 6 o'clock.
также To be seriously affected by; to feel deeply. He took his brother's death very much to heart. He took his friend's advice to heart.
также To begin to run or run away. When he heard the police coming, the thief took to his heels.
To reprove or scold for a fault or error. He took his wife to task for her foolish wastefulness. The principal took Bill to task for breaking the window.
, 1) To win all the money another person has (as in poker). Watch out if you play poker with Joe; he'll take you to the cleaners. 2) To cheat a person out of his money and possessions by means of a crooked business transaction or other means of dishonest conduct. I'll never forgive myself for becoming associated with Joe; he took me to the cleaners.
, To run away and hide. When John saw the girls coming, he took to the woods. Bob took to the woods so he would not have to mow the grass. : .
To do something one after another instead of doing it all at the same time. In class we should not talk all at the same time; we should take turns. Jean and Beth took turns on the swing. The two boys took turns at digging the hole. The three men took turns driving so one would not be too tired.
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1) To remove by taking in. Use a blotter to take up the spilled ink. When the vacuum cleaner bag is full, it will not take up dirt from the rug. 2) To fill or to occupy. All his evenings were taken up with study. The oceans take up the greater part of the earth's surface. The mayor has taken up residence on State Street. 3) To gather together; collect. We are taking up a collection to buy flowers for John because he is in the hospital. 4) To take away. John had his driver's license taken up for speeding. 5a) To begin; start. The teacher took up the lesson where she left off yesterday. 5b) To begin to do or learn; go into as a job or hobby. He recently took up gardening. He took up the carpenter's trade as a boy. : . 6) To pull and make tight or shorter; shorten. The tailor took up the legs of the trousers. Take up the slack on the rope! : . 7) To take or accept something that is offered. The boss offered me a $5 raise and I took him up. I took John up on his bet. : .
, . To get ready to fight; fight or make war. The people were quick to take up arms to defend their freedom. The President called on people to take up arms against poverty. : .
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, To come to the defense of; to support or fight for. He was the first to take up the cudgels for his friend. : .
To begin to go around with (someone); see a lot of. Frank has taken up with Lucy lately.
также To accept or believe only in part; not accept too much. A man who says he is not a candidate for President should usually have his statement taken with a grain of salt. We took Uncle George's stories of the war with a pinch of salt.
, To use a radar-operated speed indicator in order to enforce the 55 MPH speed limit. The Smokeys are taking pictures!
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A person employed by a large organization to seek out promising and gifted individuals. Gordon has been working as a talent scout for a television program. : .
An entertainment in which new entertainers try to win a prize. Mary won the talent show by her dancing. The people liked Bill's singing in the talent show.
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, To talk on and on, usually very fast. Sue is a nice girl but after one drink she talks a blue streak and won't stop.
также , To answer rudely; reply in a disrespectful way; be fresh. When the teacher told the boy to sit down, he talked back to her and said she couldn't make him. Mary talked back when her mother told her to stop watching television; she said, "I don't have to if I don't want to." Russell was going somewhere with some bad boys, when his father told him it was wrong, Russell answered him back, "Mind your own business."
, To talk boastfully; brag. He talks big about his pitching, but he hasn't won a game.
1) To make (someone) silent by talking louder or longer. Sue tried to give her ideas, but the other girls talked her down. : . To use words or ideas that are too easy. The speaker talked down to the students, and they were bored.
A book recorded by voice on phonograph records for blind people. Billy, who was blind, learned history from a talking book.
Something good about a person or thing that can be talked about in selling it. The streamlined shape of the car was one of its talking points. John tried to get Mary to date Bill. One of his talking points was that Bill was captain of the football team.
To waste time by saying words that don't mean very much. After three hours at the negotiating table, the parties decided to call it quits because they realized that they had been talking in circles.
1) To get (someone) to agree to; make (someone) decide on (doing something) by talking; persuade to. — Used with a verbal noun. Bob talked us into walking home with him. : . Contrast . 2) To cause to be in or to get into by talking. You talked us into this mess. Now get us out! Mr. Jones lost the customer in his store by arguing with him. "You'll talk us into the poor house yet!" said Mrs. Jones. : .
Something that has become so popular or prominent that everyone is discussing it. Even after three decades, Picasso's famous metal statue is still the talk of the town in Chicago.
To talk all about and leave nothing out; discuss until everything is agreed on; settle. After their quarrel, Jill and John talked things out and reached full agreement.
1) To persuade not to; make agree or decide not to. — Used with a verbal noun. Mary's mother talked her out of quitting school. : . 2) To allow to go or get out by talking; let escape by talking. Johnny is good at talking his way out of trouble. : .
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1) To talk together about; try to agree about or decide by talking; discuss. Tom talked his plan over with his father before he bought the car. The boys settled their argument by talking it over. 2) To persuade; make agree or willing; talk and change the mind of. Fred is trying to talk Bill over to our side. : .
To say silly things; talk nonsense. He's talking rot when he says that our company is almost bankrupt.
, To talk about things in your work or trade. Two chemists were talking shop, and I hardly understood a word they said.
, To say something without knowing or understanding the facts; talk foolishly or ignorantly. John said that the earth is nearer the sun in summer, but the teacher said he was talking through his hat.
, To talk about something in a really businesslike way; talk with the aim of getting things done. Charles said, "Now, let's talk turkey about the bus trip. The fact is, it will cost each student $1.50." The father always spoke gently to his son, but when the son broke the windshield of the car, the father talked turkey to him.
1) To speak in favor or support of. Let's talk up the game and get a big crowd. 2) To speak plainly or clearly. The teacher asked the student to talk up. : . 3) To say what you want or think; say what someone may not like. Talk up if you want more pie. George isn't afraid to talk up when he disagrees with the teacher. : , : .
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1) To meddle with (something); handle ignorantly or foolishly. He tampered with the insides of his watch and ruined it. 2) To secretly get someone to do or say wrong things, especially by giving him money, or by threatening to hurt him. A friend of the man being tried in court tampered with a witness.
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, To give a beating to; spank hard. Bob's father tanned his hide for staying out too late.
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To decrease; reduce. He has tapered down his drinking from three martinis to one beer a day.
1) To come to an end little by little; become smaller toward the end. The river tapers off here and becomes a brook. 2) To stop a habit gradually; do something less and less often. Robert gave up smoking all at once instead of tapering off. : .
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To pour heated tar on and cover with feathers as a punishment. In the Old West bad men were sometimes tarred and feathered and driven out of town.
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, Predicament in which taxpayers in middle-income brackets are required to pay steeply progressive rates of taxation as their earnings rise with inflation but their personal exemptions remain fixed, resulting in a loss of real disposable income. Everybody in my neighborhood has been caught in a tax trap.
A steak with a bone in it which looks like a "T". On Jim's birthday we had T-bone steak for supper.
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To show that bad behavior can be harmful. When Johnny pulled Mary's hair, she taught him a lesson by breaking his toy boat. The burns Tommy got from playing with matches taught him a lesson.
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To join with; enter into companionship with. My brother prefers to do business by himself rather than to team up with anybody else.
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To be constantly on the go; dash around. No one can understand how she manages to tear around from one social event to another and yet be a good mother to her children.
1) To take all down in pieces; destroy. The workmen tore down the old house and built a new house in its place. 2. To take to pieces or parts. The mechanics had to tear down the engine, and fix it, and put it together again. 3) To say bad things about; criticize. "Why do you always tear people down? Why don't you try to say nice things about them?" Dorothy doesn't like Sandra, and at the class meeting she tore down every idea Sandra suggested.
To attack vigorously, physically or verbally. The anxious buyers tore into the wedding gowns on sale at the famous department store. : .
A sentimental novel or movie that makes one cry. Love Story, both in its novel form and as a movie, was a famous tearjerker.
To force oneself to leave; leave reluctantly. The beaches in Hawaii are so lovely that I had to tear myself away from them in order to get back to my job in Chicago.
To show sorrow, anger, or defeat. Ben tore his hair when he saw the wrecked car. The teacher tore his hair at the boy's stupid answer. It was time to go to class, but Mary had not finished the report she had to give, and she began tearing her hair.
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1) To dig a hole in; remove the surface of; remove from the surface. The city tore up the street to lay a new water pipe. Mother tore up the carpeting in the living room and had a new rug put in. 2) To tear into pieces. Mary tore up the old sheets and made costumes for the play out of the pieces. John tore up his test paper so that his mother wouldn't see his low grade.
1) To hit the golf ball from a small wooden peg or tee to begin play for each hole. We got to the golf course just in time to see the champion tee off. 2) To hit a ball, especially a baseball very hard or far. He teed off on the first pitch. 3) To attack vigorously. The governor teed off on his opponent's speech. 4) To make (someone) angry or disgusted. It teed me off when Billy stole my candy. Joe was teed off because he had to wait so long.
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To set the golf ball on the tee in preparation for hitting it toward the green. Arnold Palmer teed the ball up for the final hole.
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To see the difference between; know each of. The teacher could not tell the twins apart.
, To tell in plain or angry words; scold. When John complained about the hard work, his father told him a thing or two. If Bert thinks he would like to join the army, I'll tell him a thing or two that will make him change his mind. : .
, To be honest, sincere; to tell the truth. Joe is the leader of our commune; he tells it like it is.
или I don't believe you; Stop trying to fool me. John said, "My father knows the President of the United States." Dick answered, "Tell it to the marines."
1) To name or count one by one and give some special duty to; give a share to. Five boy scouts were told off to clean the camp. 2) To speak to angrily or sharply; attack with words; scold. Mr. Black got angry and told off the boss. Bobby kept pulling Sally's hair; finally she got angry and told him where to get off. : tell one where to get off. : give a piece of one's mind, lay down the law, tell a thing or two.
1) To tire; wear out; make weak. The ten-mile hike told on Bill. 2) To tell someone about another's wrong or naughty acts. — Used mainly by children. Andy hit a little girl and John told the teacher on Andy. If you hit me, I'll tell Mother on you.
To tell something that is secret; tell others something that is not meant to be known. Don't tell Jane anything. She is always telling tales out of school. : .
или , To talk angrily to; speak to or answer with rough language; scold. Bob told Ted to get out of his way. Ted told Bob where to get off. Mary laughed at Barbara's hairdo. Barbara told Mary where to head in. : .
To read a clock or watch. Although Johnny is only three years old, he is already able to tell time.
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Great excitement about something not important. Bess tore her skirt a little and made a tempest in a teapot.
или To take a chance; run a risk; gamble. You're tempting fate every time you drive that old wreck of a car.
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, , Do you understand? Is that a ten-four?
, A tall felt hat with a wide, rolled brim worn by men in the western part of the U.S. Men from the southwest usually wear ten gallon hats.
, I acknowledge. That's a ten roger.
или или , Almost certainly, nearly sure to be true; very likely to happen. Ten to one it will rain tomorrow. It is ten; to one that Bill will be late.
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, To be thankful for good luck; think oneself lucky. You can thank your lucky stars you didn't fall in the hole.
1) With the help of. Thanks to a good teacher, John passed the examination. I finally finished washing the dishes, no thanks to you. 2) Owing to; because of. Thanks to a sudden rain, the children came home with wet clothes.
или I mean; that means; in other words. John is a New Yorker; that is, he lives in New York. Susan is a good student; that is to say, she gets good grades in school.
или The matter is decided; there is nothing more to be said; it is done. Jim, you will go to school this morning, and that is that.
That will never happen. Joe wanted me to lend him money to take my girl to the movies. That'll be the day! "Wouldn't it be nice if we had to go to school only one day a week?" "That'll be the day!"
Informal way to say, "I am in agreement with what you arc saying or doing." So you voted for Senator Aldridge? So did I — that makes two of us.
Informal way to say, "That concludes our business." I paid my ex-wife the last alimony check and that takes care of that!
Informal expression of impatience meaning "stop," "no more." "That will do, Tommy," his mother cried. "I've had just about enough of your drumming on the table."
That's the way (someone or something) is; (someone or something) is like that. John tried hard, but he lost the game. That's life for you. Mary changed her mind about going. That's a girl for you.
Informal way to say, "What you said is true; the rumor or the news is true." "I am told you're leaving our firm for Japan," Fred said to Tom. "That's about the size of it," Tom replied with a grin.
Usually spoken when something goes wrong. I spent seven years writing a novel, but no publisher wants to accept it. That's the story of my life.
Informal way to say, "excellent; correct." "First we'll go up the Sears Tower, and then we'll take a night sightseeing tour on the lake," Fran said. "That's the ticket!" Stan, an old inhabitant of Chicago, replied.
или Nothing unusual about that. — Said of unpleasant things. "Susan left me for a heavyweight boxer, and then I got drunk and wrecked my car," Bob bitterly complained. "Well, that's the way the cookie crumbles," Pam answered philosophically.
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, — Usually used with "give" or "get". 1. All that you are able to do; greatest effort. Johnny gave the tryouts the business but he failed to make the team. 2) The most harm possible; the greatest damage or hurt. Fred got the business when Tom caught him with his bicycle. 3) A harsh scolding. The teacher gave Walter the business when he came to school late again. Mike thought he was the star of the team until he got the business from the coach. : .
A humorous and convenient way to pass the blame. "My vase is broken!" Mother shrieked in horror. "Well," Dad smirked cynically, "I guess the cat did it!"
, 1) An uncomfortable tightening of the skin caused by fear or shock. Reading the story of a ghost gave Joe the creeps. The queer noises in the old house gave Mary the creeps. 2) A strong feeling of fear or disgust. The cold, damp, lonely swamp gave John the creeps. The dog was so ugly it gave Mary the creeps.
A severe penalty. If we don't finish the work by next Monday, there will be the devil to pay.
, The advantage. — Usually used in the phrases "get the edge on", "have the edge on". In the last quarter of the game, our team got the edge on the other team and kept it. Mary has the edge on Jane in the beauty contest.
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или — Used in exclamations to show that you do not like something. The idea! Thinking Mother was my sister! The very idea of Tom bringing that dirty dog into my clean house!
, Something that holds back or holds out of sight. The police blew the lid off the gambling operations. John kept the lid on his plans until he was ready to run for class president. The chief of police placed the lid on gambling in the town.
Something like or similar to; something of the same kind as. I have never seen the likes of John. It was a chocolate sundae the likes of which Mary would never see again.
или All that needs to be said; the basic fact; point. The long and the short of the matter is that the man is no actor. The money isn't there, and that's the long and short of it.
Not as it should be; wrong. — Used in questions or with negatives or "if". Why don't you answer me? What's the matter? John may be slow in arithmetic, but nothing's the matter with his pitching arm. If anything is the matter, please tell me.
или — Used in two halves of a sentence to show that when there is more of the first, there is more of the second too. The more you eat. the fatter you will get. Get your report in when you can; the sooner, the better. The bigger they are, the harder they fall. The more Bill worked on the arithmetic problem, the more confused he became.
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As an opposite possibility; another thing. He may be here tomorrow. Then again, he may not come until next week. I thought you told me about the fire, but then again it could have been Bill.
At that very time and place in the past; right then. He said he wanted his dime back then and there, so I had to give it to him. : .
In the recent past. I saw an incredible parade of elephants along Michigan Avenue the other day on my way to work.
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The way things are or were; the facts about something; the situation; what happened or happens. Where does Susan come into the picture. When you are looking for a job your education enters into the picture. Old Mr. Brown is out of the picture now and his son runs the store. After the fight on the playground, the principal talked to the boys who were watching, until he got the whole picture. : .
, 1) A low class, blighted and ill-maintained place, motel room or apartment. Max, this motel is the pits, I will not sleep here! 2) The end of the road, the point of no return, the point of total ruin of one's health (from the drug anticulture referring to the arm-pits as the only place that had veins for injections). John flunked high school this year for the third time; he will never get to college; it's the pits for him. 3) A very depressed state of mind. Poor Marcy is down in the pits over her recent divorce.
Constituted authority; those in power. I have done all I can; the rest is up to the powers that be.
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или 1) Informal way to say, "Here is what you wanted." The doorman politely opened the door of the taxi and said, "There you are, sir!" The clerk wrapped up the package and handed it to the customer saying, "Here you are, ma'am!" 2) You have found the correct answer; you are correct. "The reason for the violent crime rate is the all too easy availability of handguns," he said. "Yeah, there you are!" Officer Maloney replied.
или или There are always new and different ways to accomplish a difficult task. — A proverb. "'How did you get Tommy to study so hard?" Eleanor asked. "I simply disconnected the television set," Tommy's mother answered. "There's more than one way to get a pig to market."
Informal way to say, "It is easy." Cooking stir-fried Chinese food is really not difficult at all; in fact, there's nothing to it.
1) Informal way to say, "You are doing it already and you are doing it well." "Is roller skating hard?" Freddie asked. "No," Beth replied, "let me show you how to do it. There you go!" 2) : или .
, , Thorough or special knowledge of a job; how to do something; the ways of people or the world. On a newspaper a cub reporter learns his job from an older reporter who knows the ropes. When you go to a new school it takes a while to learn the ropes. Betty showed Jane the ropes when she was learning to make a dress. Mr. Jones was an orphan and he had to learn the ropes when he was young to make his way in the world. : .
, The truth; the real story or information; what is really happening; the way people and the world really are. Very few people know the score in politics. You are too young to know the score yet. What's the score anyhow? When will the program begin? : .
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(W)riting, reading, and (a)rithmetic, the three basic skills of an elementary education. Barry has completed the three R's, but otherwise he has had little formal education.
Exactly what is needed. — Often used with "just". This airtight locker is just the ticket for storing your winter clothes.
The line between the rich or fashionable part of town and the poor or unfashionable part of town. The poor children knew they would not be welcome on the other side of the tracks. Mary's mother did not want her to date Jack, because he came from across the tracks. — Often used in the expression "the wrong side of the tracks". The mayor was born on the wrong side of the tracks, but he worked hard and became successful.
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Knowing about something which might be embarrassing of knowing. — Usually used with "nobody" or "no one". Mary took the teacher's book home by mistake, but early the next morning she returned it with nobody the wiser.
, , 1) Everything that can be had or that you have; everything of this kind, all that goes with it. When the tramp found $100, he went into a fine restaurant and ordered the works with a steak dinner. 1b) : . 2) Rough handling or treatment; a bad beating or scolding; killing; murder. — Usually used with "get" or "give". The boy said that Joe was going to get the works if he ever came back to that neighborhood again. The newspaper gave the police department the works when they let the burglars get away. The gangster told his friend he would give him the works if he double-crossed him. : .
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, 1) Facts not generally known, or not known to the hearer or reader; unusual or important information. Mary told Joan a thing or two about Betty's real feelings. 2) A lot; much. Bob knows a thing or two about sailing. : .
Informal way to say that conditions are improving. Things are looking up at our university as the governor promised a 5% salary raise.
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или также To consider to be very worthy, valuable, or important; to esteem highly. Mary thinks a great deal of Tim. The teacher thought a lot of Joe's project. — The phrase "think much of" is usually used in negative sentences. Father didn't think much of Paul's idea of buying a goat to save lawn mowing. : .
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или To say what you are thinking. "I wish I had more money for Christmas presents," Father thought aloud. "What did you say?" said Mother. Father answered, "I'm sorry. I wasn't talking to you. I was thinking out loud."
To change your mind about; to consider again and make a better decision about. John told his mother he wanted to leave school, but later he thought better of it. : .
, To believe in one's ability, purpose, or power to perform or succeed. Be confident; be positive; tell yourself you are the greatest; above all, think big!
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Think that (something or someone) is not important or valuable. John thought little of Ted's plan for the party. Joan thought little of walking two miles to school. : .
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To think or consider easy, simple, or usual. Jim thinks nothing of hiking ten miles in one day.
, Used as a courteous phrase in replying to thanks. "Thank you very much for your help." "Think nothing of it." : .
To think quickly; answer or act without waiting; know what to do or say right away. A good basketball player can think on his feet. Our teacher can think on his feet; he always has an answer ready when we ask him questions.
1) To find out or discover by thinking; study and understand. Andy thought out a way of climbing to the top of the pole. : . 2) To think through to the end; to understand what would come at last. Bill wanted to quit school, but he thought out the matter and decided not to.
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To think carefully about; consider; study. When Charles asked Betty to marry him, she asked him for time to think it over. Think over what we studied in history this year and write a lesson on the thing that interested you most. : .
, 1) The human brain. Lou's got one powerful think piece, man. 2) Any provocative essay or article that, by stating a strong opinion, arouses the reader to think about it and react to it by agreeing or disagreeing. That article by Charles Fenyvesi on Vietnamese refugees in the Washington Post sure was a think piece!
A company of researchers who spend their time developing ideas and concepts. The government hired a think tank to study the country's need for coins, and was advised to stop making pennies.
To think again carefully; reconsider; hesitate. The teacher advised Lou to think twice before deciding to quit school. : .
To invent or discover by thinking; have a new idea of. Mary thought up a funny game for the children to play.
The base to be touched third in baseball. He reached third base standing up on a long triple.
1) The third best or highest group; the class next after the second class. Mary won the pie-making contest in the third class, for the youngest girls. 2) Mail that is printed, other than magazines and newspapers that are published regularly, and packages that are not sealed and weigh less than a pound. The company uses third class to mail free samples of soap. 3) The least expensive class of travel. I couldn't afford anything better than the third class on the ship coming home from France. : .
Belonging to the third class; of the third highest or best class. Much advertising is sent by third-class mall. I bought a third-class airline ticket to Hawaii.
By third class. How did you send the package? Third class. We traveled third-class on the train.
A method of severe grilling used to extract information from an arrested suspect. "Why give me the third degree?" he asked indignantly. "All I did was come home late because I had a drink with my friends."
, , Homosexual individuals who are either men or women. Billy is rumored to belong to the third sex.
1) The countries not aligned with either the former U.S.S.R.-dominated Communist bloc or the U.S.A.-dominated capitalist countries. New Zealand made a move toward third country status when it disallowed American nuclear submarines in its harbors. 2. The developing nations of the world where the industrial revolution has not yet been completed. Africa and the rest of the third world must be freed from starvation and illiteracy.
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также Various things; different things; miscellaneous things. When the old friends met they would talk about this and that. The quilt was made of this, that, and the other.
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или , That's how things are; that's life. It's too bad about John and Mary getting divorced, but then that's how the cookie crumbles.
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или Something that causes stubborn trouble; a constant bother; a vexation. The new voter organization soon became the biggest thorn in the senator's side. The guerrilla band was a thorn in the flesh of the invaders.
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To discuss fully; confer about something until a decision is reached. They met to thrash out their differences concerning how to run the office.
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A scene of much confusion or activity. The street was a three-ring circus of cars, people, noise, and lights. It is a three-ring circus to watch that silly dog play.
или , Unsteady from too much liquor; drunk. The sailor came down the street, three sheets in the wind.
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Completely; entirely; whole-heartedly. Bob was a ball player through and through. Mary was hurt through and through by Betty's remarks. : .
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1) A street on which cars can move without stopping at intersections, but cars on streets crossing it have to stop at the intersection. You have to be especially careful crossing a through street. Mr. Jones stopped his car when he came to the through street. He waited until there were no cars on it, and drove across it. : . 2) A street that is open to other streets at both ends; a street that has a passage through it, so that it is not necessary to come back to get out of it. We thought we could get through to Main St. by going up a side street but there was a sign that said "Not a through street."
1) Experienced. You could tell immediately that the new employee had been through the mill. 2) Through real experience of the difficulties of a certain way of life. Poor Jerry has had three operations in one year, and now he's back in the hospital. He's realty gone through the mill. : , .
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Through all difficulties and troubles; through good times and bad times. The friends were faithful through thick and thin. George stayed in college through thick and thin, because he wanted an education.
A direct train that doesn't necessitate any changes. We'll take the through train from Chicago to New York because it's the most convenient.
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, 1) To mislead or deceive someone; to lie. John threw me a curve about the hiring. 2. To take someone by surprise in an unpleasant way. Mr. Weiner's announcement threw the whole company a curve.
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или , To cause something that is going smoothly to stop. The game was going smoothly until you threw a monkey wrench into the works by fussing about the rules. The Michigan tacklers threw a wrench into the Wisconsin team's offense. He hoped to see the class plan fail and looked for a chance to throw a wrench in the machinery.
, To hold a party; have a party. The club is throwing a party in the high school gym Saturday night. The Seniors threw a masquerade party on Halloween.
To strike at someone with your fist; hit; punch. Bob became so mad at Fred that he threw a punch at him. The bell rang and the boxers started throwing punches. : .
1) To get rid of as unwanted or not needed; junk. Before they moved they threw away everything they didn't want to take with them. I never save those coupons; I just throw them away. : . 2) To waste. The senator criticized the government for throwing away billions on the space program. 3) To fail to make use of. She threw away a good chance for a better job.
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также To be daring; make a bold or risky move. Hearing that Apaches were planning to start a war, the whites decided to throw caution to the winds and attack the Apaches first.
также или To discourage; say or do something to discourage. We had high hopes of victory but our opponents soon threw cold water on them. Henry's father threw cold water on his plans to go to college by saying he could not afford it.
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To challenge, especially to a fight. Another candidate for the presidency has thrown down the gauntlet.
1) To tackle a member of the opposing football team behind the place where his team had the ball at the beginning of the play; push the other team back so that they lose yardage in football. The Blues' quarterback ran back and tried to pass, but before he could, the Reds' end threw him for a loss. : . 2) To surprise or shock (someone); upset; make worry greatly; cause trouble. It threw Jim for a loss when he failed the test. Mr. Simpson was thrown for a loss when he lost his job. : .
1) To give or put in as an addition; to give to or with something else. John threw in a couple of tires when he sold Bill his bicycle. Mary and Tess were talking about the prom, and Joan threw in that she was going with Fred. : . 2) To push into operating position. Mr. Jones threw in the clutch and shifted the gears.
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или To blame a person for (something wrong); not allow someone to forget (a mistake or failure). — Often used with "back". Bob came home late for dinner last week, and his mother keeps throwing it back in his face. I made a mistake in the ball game and the boys keep throwing it back in my teeth. : .
или To decide to share or take part in anything that happens to; join. The thief decided to throw in his lot with the gang when he heard their plans. Washington was rich, but he decided to cast in his lot with the colonies against Britain. When Carl was old enough to vote, he threw in his lot with the Democrats. : .
или или , To admit defeat; accept loss. After taking a beating for five rounds, the fighter's seconds threw in the sponge. When Harold saw his arguments were not being accepted, he threw in the towel and left. : .
1) To get free from. He was healthy enough to throw off his cold easily. : . 2) To mislead; confuse; fool. They went by a different route to throw the hostile bandits off their track. 3) To produce easily or as if without effort. She could throw off a dozen poems in a night.
To mislead; confuse. The robbers went different ways hoping to throw the sheriff's men off the scent. : .
To divert; mislead; confuse. The clever criminals threw the detective off the track by changing their names and faces. : .
To make a public display of serving, loving, or worshipping someone. When Arthur became king, almost all of the nobles threw themselves at his feet and promised to obey and serve him. When the new girl entered school, several boys threw themselves at her feet.
или , To try hard and openly to make a person love you. She threw herself at his head, but he was interested in another girl. : .
или , To announce that you are going to try to be elected to an official position; become a candidate for office. Bill tossed his hat in the ring for class president. The senator threw his hat in the ring for re-election.
, To use one's influence or position in a showy or noisy manner. John was the star of the class play, and he was throwing his weight around telling the director how the scene should be played. Bob was stronger than the other boys, and he threw his weight around. : .
1) To open wide with a sudden or strong movement. He dashed in and threw open the windows. 2) To remove limits from. The Homestead Act threw open the West. When a hurricane and flood left many people homeless, public buildings were thrown open to shelter them.
или 1) To turn someone into a scapegoat. In order to explain the situation to the media, the governor blamed the mayor and threw him to the wolves. 2) To send into danger without protection. Mary was very shy. Her friends did not come to speak before the club in her place. They threw her to the wolves. The boys on the football team were so small that when they played a good team they were thrown to the wolves.
или 1) To put somewhere to be destroyed because not wanted. He didn't need the brush anymore so he threw it out. : (1). 2) To refuse to accept. The inspector tossed out all the parts that didn't work. 3) To force to leave; dismiss. When the employees complained too loudly, the owner threw them out. : . 4) To cause to be out in baseball by throwing the ball. The shortstop tossed the runner out.
1) To separate the gears of (a car or some other machine) when you want to stop it. When John wanted to stop, he threw the car out of gear and braked sharply. 2) To stop or bother (what someone is doing or planning); confuse; upset. The whole country was thrown out of gear by the assassination of the President. My mother's illness threw my plans for the summer out of gear.
To give up for another; break your loyalty or attachment to. Bob threw Mary over for a new girlfriend. Tom threw over those who helped him run for class president after he was elected.
To reject all of something because part is faulty. God knows that there are weaknesses in the program, but if they act too hastily they may cause the baby to be thrown out with the bathwater.
, To give the most severe penalty to (someone) for breaking the law or rules. Because it was the third time he had been caught speeding that month, the judge threw the book at him.
1) also To make in a hurry and without care. Bill and Bob threw together a cabin out of old lumber. The party was planned suddenly, and Mary threw together a meal out of leftovers. 2) To put in with other people by chance. The group of strangers was thrown together when the storm trapped them on the highway. Bill and Tom became friends when they were thrown together in the same cabin at camp.
1) или . To vomit. The heat made him feel sick and he thought he would throw up. He took the medicine but threw it up a minute later. 2) To quit; leave; let go; give up. When she broke their engagement he threw up his job and left town. 3) To build in a hurry. The contractor threw up some temporary sheds to hold the new equipment. 4) To mention often as an insult. His father threw up John's wastefulness to him.
To give up trying; admit that you cannot succeed. Mrs. Jones threw up her hands when the children messed up the living room for the third time. When Mary saw the number of dishes to be washed, she threw up her hands in dismay.
To be horrified; feel alarmed; give up hope of straightening things out; be shocked by something terrible. When Mrs. Brown saw the mess the children were making in her living room, she threw up her hands in horror. Everybody threw up their hands in horror at the destruction caused by the hurricane.
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, To get a ride by hitchhiking; hitchhike. Not having much money, Carl decided to thumb a ride to New York.
1) To hold one's open hand in front of one's face with one's thumb pointed at one's nose as a sign of scorn or dislike. After Bob ran into the house he thumbed his nose at Tom through the window. 2) To look with disfavor or dislike; regard with scorn; refuse to obey. — Used with "at". Betty thumbed her nose at her mother's command to stay home. Mary thumbed her nose at convention by wearing odd clothes. : .
To examine superficially; read cursorily. I have read "War and Peace" but Fran has only thumbed through it.
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также In a particular way; according to directions that have been given. The teacher is very fussy about the way you write your report. If you don't do it thus and so, she gives you a lower mark.
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, To please very much; thrill; delight. Usually used in the passive participle. Nancy was tickled pink with her new dress.
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1) To mention one after the other; list. The teacher ticked off the assignments that Jane had to do. 2) To scold; rebuke. The boss ticked off the waitress for dropping her tray. 3) To anger or upset. — Usually used as ticked off. She was ticked off at him for breaking their dinner date again.
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To carry past a difficulty or danger; help in bad times or in trouble. He was out of work last winter but he had saved enough money to tide him over until spring. An ice cream cone in the afternoon tided her over until supper. : .
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A large amount of money. The Smith's big new home cost them a tidy sum. : .
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To keep (someone) from going somewhere or doing something; prevent from leaving; keep in. Mrs. Brown can't come to the party. She's tied down at home with the children sick. The navy tied the enemy down with big gunfire while the marines landed on the beach. I can't help you with history now! I'm tied down with these algebra problems.
Not independent of your mother; not able to do anything without asking your mother. Even after he grew up he was still tied to his mother's apron strings.
To connect with something else; make a connection for. — Often used with "with". The teacher tied in what she said with last week's lesson. The English teacher sometimes gives compositions that tie in with things we are studying in other classes. The detectives tied in the fingerprints on the man's gun with those found on the safe, so they knew that he was the thief.
A connection; a point of meeting. John's essay on World War II provides a perfect tie-in with his earlier work on World War I.
To make (someone) very nervous or worried. The thought of having her tooth pulled tied Joan in knots. The little boy's experience with the kidnapper tied him in knots and it was hard for him to sleep well for a long time.
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To make (a person) unable to do anything. — Usually used in the passive. Since Mary would not tell her mother what was bothering her, her mother's hands were tied. Charles wanted to help John get elected president of the class, but his promise to another boy tied his hands. Father hoped Jim would not quit school, but his hands were tied; Jim was old enough to quit if he wanted to.
, To get married; also to perform a wedding ceremony. Diane and Bill tied the knot yesterday. The minister tied the knot for Diane and Bill yesterday.
1) To show or stop the movement or action of; hinder; tangle. The crash of the two trucks tied up all traffic in the center of town. The strike tied up the factory. 2) To take all the time of. The meeting will tie the President up until noon. The Senate didn't vote because a debate on a small point kept it tied up all week. He can't see you now. He's tied up on the telephone. 3) To limit or prevent the use of. His money is tied up in a trust fund and he can't take it out. Susan tied up the bathroom for an hour. 4) To enter into an association or partnership; join. Our company has tied up with another firm to support the show. 5) To dock. The ships tied up at New York. 6) To finish; complete. We've talked long enough; let's tie up these plans and start doing things.
A congestion; a stoppage of the normal flow of traffic, business or correspondence. There was a two-hour traffic tie-up on the highway. No pay checks were delivered because of the mail service tie-up.
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An end in football who plays close to the tackle in the line. The tight end is used to catch passes but most often to block. : .
To live on less money than usual; use less food and other things. When father lost his job we had to tighten our belts. Often used in the expression "tighten one's belt another notch". When the husband lost his job, the Smiths had to do without many things, but when their savings were all spent, they had to tighten their belts another notch.
To try to make someone do something by making it more and more difficult not to do it; apply pressure. When many students still missed class after he began giving daily quizzes, the teacher tightened the screws by failing anyone absent four times.
A taciturn person; one who doesn't say much. The witness was tight-lipped about what she saw for fear of physical retaliation by the mob.
The opposite of inflation, when money is hard to borrow from the banks. The government decided that tight money is the way to bring down inflation.
A difficult situation; financial troubles. The Browns aren't going out to dinner these days; they are in a tight squeeze.
A stingy person. My father is such a tightwad that he won't give me an allowance.
A police car. I've got a Tijuana taxi in sight.
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Until sunset; until the last. The women in the country used to sit in the spinning room making yarn out of skeins of wool, usually till the cows came home.
или Until the end; until everything is finished or decided. Fred always liked to stay at parties until the last gun was fired. The candidate didn't give up hope of being elected until the last gun was fired.
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, To do battle with an imaginary foe (after Cervantes' Don Quixote). John is a nice guy but when it comes to departmental meetings he wastes everybody's time by constantly tilting at windmills.
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или Many times; repeatedly; very often, I've told you time and again not to touch the vase! Children are forgetful and must be told time and time again how to behave.
Pay given to a worker at a rate half again as much as he usually gets. John got time and a half when he worked beyond his usual quitting time. Tom gets one dollar for regular pay and a dollar and a half for time and a half.
The best time has come for doing something. The Prime Minister will hold elections when the time is ripe. Lee saw his mother was upset, so he decided the time was not ripe to tell her about the broken window.
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A period of release from work. If I had some time off this afternoon, I would finish writing the letters I promised to my family.
A very happy or wonderful time. John had the time of his life at the party. I could see that she was having the time of her life.
Time during which a game, a lecture, a discussion or other activity is stopped for a while for some extra questions or informal discussion, or some other reason. He took a time out from studying to go to a movie. The player called time out so he could tie his shoe. "Time out!" — The students said, "Could you explain that again?"
1) A lack of sensitivity to noise. The construction noise doesn't bother Fred; he's got a tin ear. 2) A lack of musical ability; state of being tone deaf. People with a tin ear make poor choir members.
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The pop music industry. What kind of music will Tin Pan Alley come up with this year?
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, To tell something not generally known; tell secret facts to; warn. The class president tipped off the class that it was the superintendent's birthday. The thieves did not rob the bank as planned because someone tipped them off that it was being watched by the police. : .
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, 1) To weigh. Martin tips the scales at 180 pounds. 2) or To have important or decisive influence; make a decision go for or against you; decide. John's vote tipped the scales in our favor, and we won the election. : .
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Equal treatment in return; a fair exchange. Billy hit me, so I gave him tit for tat. I told him if he did me any harm I would return tit for tat. They had a warm debate and the two boys gave each other tit for tat. : .
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1) Very; to a large extent. In some things I am ignorant to a degree. 2) Somewhat; slightly; in a small way; rather. His anger was, to a degree, a confession of defeat. To a degree, Mary was to blame for Bob's failing mathematics, because he spent much time with her when he should have been studying.
So as to bring out the good qualities of; favorably; in a flattering way. The jeweler's window showed the diamonds to advantage. The green dress showed up to advantage with her red hair.
So very well that it is in a way bad; to the point of being rather foolish; too well; too much. Aunt May wants everything in her house to be exactly right; she is neat to a fault. Mary acts her part to a fault. John carries thoroughness to a fault; he spends many hours writing his reports.
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In most ways; in fact. The president is called the head of state, but the prime minister, to all intents and purposes, is the chief executive.
Without exception; with all agreeing. The workers voted to a man to go on strike. To a man John's friends stood by him in his trouble. : .
Forward and back again and again. Father pushed Judy in the swing, and she went to and fro. Busses go to and fro between the center of the city and the city limits The man walked to and fro while he waited for his phone call. : .
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или Just right; to perfection; exactly. The roast was done to a turn. His nickname, Tiny, suited him to a T. : .
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That is going to be; about to become. — Used after the noun it modifies. Bob kissed his bride-to-be. The principal of the high school greeted the high school students-to-be on their last day in junior high.
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To take extra precautions; reduce or eliminate the possibility of a mistake, an error, or even danger. Dad always keeps his valuables in a bank's safe deposit box, just to be on the safe side. : .
Without a doubt; certainly; surely. "Didn't you say Mr. Smith would take us home?" "Oh, yes. To be sure, I did." — Often used before a clause beginning with "but". He works slowly, to be sure, but he does a good job. To be sure, Jim is a fast skater, but he is not good at doing figures. : .
Having done something wrong; to be blamed; responsible. John was to blame for the broken window. The teacher tried to find out who was to blame in the fight.
In addition; besides; as something extra. He not only got fifty dollars, but they bought him dinner to boot. : .
или Up to the present time; until now. To date twenty students have been accepted into the school. The police have not found the runaway to date. Jim is shoveling snow to earn money, but his earnings to date are small. : .
, To the limit; to the greatest degree possible. — Used for emphasis with verbs such as "scare", "frighten", "bore". Cowboy stories bore me to death, but I like mysteries. Sara is scared to death of snakes. John is tickled to death with his new bike.
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или To be very careful to do just what you are supposed to do; obey the rules and do your duties. The new teacher will make Joe toe the line. Bill's father is strict with him and he has to toe the mark. : .
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In addition to; in the company of; along with. John, together with his brother, has gone to the party. The police found a knife, together with the stolen money, hidden in a hollow tree.
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1) Close behind. The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel. 2) Under control; to obedience. When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his allowance, and Peter soon came to heel.
или , Used to express disgusted rejection of something. It's slop; the hell with what the cook calls it. : .
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A long distance telephone call for which one has to pay. We had several toll calls on last month's telephone bill.
Calling an (800) telephone number with the call paid by the business whose number one has dialed. You can call us day and night, seven days a week, toll free.
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People in general; anyone; everyone. — Usually preceded by "every" and used to show scorn or disrespect. The drunk told his troubles to every Tom, Dick and Harry who passed by.
To make softer or quieter; make less harsh or strong; moderate. He toned down the sound of the TV. She wanted the bright colors in her house toned down. When the ladies arrived, he toned down his language. The strikers were asked to tone down their demands for higher pay so that there might be a quicker agreement and an end to the strike.
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In an ironic or insincere manner. When the faculty complained about the poor salary increments, the university's president said that he was not a psychiatrist, thus making an inappropriate tongue-in-cheek remark.
A sharp scolding or criticism. Jim's mother gave him a tongue-lashing for telling family secrets. : .
People speak in an excited or gossipy manner; people spread rumors. If married women go out with other men, tongues will wag. When the bank clerk showed up in an expensive new car, tongues wagged.
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A word or group of words difficult to pronounce whose meaning is irrelevant compared to the difficulty of enunciation. "She sells sea shells by the seashore" is a popular American tongue twister.
или , Having no effect; useless, unsuccessful. Tom's practicing was of no avail. He was sick on the day of the game. Mary's attempts to learn embroidering were to no avail.
, Without result; unsuccessfully. John tried to pull the heavy cart, but to no avail. Mary studied hard for the test but to no avail. : .
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To be regretted; worthy of sorrow or regret; regrettable. — Used as a predicate. It is too bad that we are so often lazy. It was too bad Bill had measles when the circus came to town.
или Too sure of your own importance; feeling more important than you really are. That boy had grown too big for his breeches. I'll have to put him back in his place. When the teacher made Bob a monitor, he got too big for his boots and she had to warn him.
, Much too; excessively. The heroine of the story is too nice by half; she is not believable.
Perilously near (said of bad things). When the sniper's bullet hit the road the journalist exclaimed, "Gosh, that was too close for comfort!" : .
или A project is likely to go bad if managed by a multiplicity of primary movers. — A proverb. When several people acted all at once in trying to reshape the company's investment policy, Tom spoke up and said, "Let me do this by myself! Don't you know that too many cooks spoil the broth?"
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1) Silently; in the thoughts; without making a sign that others can see; secretly. Tom thought to himself that he could win. Mary said to herself that Joan was prettier than Ann. Bill laughed to himself when John fell down. 2) Without telling others; in private; as a secret. — Used after "keep". Mary keeps her affairs to herself. John knew the answer to the problem, but he kept it to himself.
1) Without company; away from others; alone; deserted. The boys went home and John was left to himself. When Mary first moved to her new neighborhood she was very shy and kept to herself. 2) Following one's own beliefs or wishes; not stopped by others. When John insisted on going, Fred left him to himself. The teacher left Mary to herself to solve the problem.
Directly to you; in your presence. I told him to his face that I didn't like the idea. I called him a coward to his face. : , : .
To a standing position; up. After Henry had been tackled hard by four big players, he got to his feet slowly and painfully. When Sally saw the bus coming, she jumped to her feet and ran out. : .
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To the extent of one's wishes; one's complete satisfaction. There is a wonderful small restaurant nearby where you can eat to your heart's content.
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In your ownership; of your own; as part of your belongings. David did not have a book to his name. Ed had only one suit to his name.
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According to directions given in an order in the way and size wanted. The manufacturer built the machine to order. A very big man often has his suits made to order. 2) : .
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With all weapons or ways of fighting as hard as possible; fiercely. — Used after "fight" or a similar word. When the Indian girl was captured, she fought tooth and nail to get away. The farmers fought tooth and nail to save their crops from the grasshoppers. His friends fought tooth and nail to elect him to Congress.
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или , The head of any business or organization; the most influential or most prestigious person in an establishment. Who's the top banana in this outfit? : .
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, Of the best; or most important kind. Mary's art work was top-drawer material. Mr. Rogers is a top-drawer executive and gets a very high salary.
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1) Into broken pieces or fragments; destroyed. The cannon shot the town to pieces. The vase fell to pieces in Mary's hand. 2) So as not to work; into a state of not operating. After 100,000 miles the car went to pieces. When Mary heard of her mother's death, she went to pieces. 3) Very much; greatly; exceedingly. Joan was thrilled to pieces to see Mary. The noise scared Bob to pieces. 4) : .
To come or bring to a special or unexpected ending; climax. John batted three runs and topped off the game with a home run. Mary hadn't finished her homework, she was late to school, and to top it all off she missed a surprise test. George had steak for dinner and topped it off with a fudge sundae.
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To understate; express as mildly as possible. After all we did for him, his behavior toward us, to say the least, was a poor way to show his appreciation.
In the same proportions as in the true size; in the same shape, but not the same size. The statue was made to scale, one inch to a foot. He drew the map to scale, making one inch represent fifty miles.
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, Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. — Usually used in negative sentences. Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of. What happened at the meeting? Nothing to speak of. Judy's injuries were nothing to speak of; just a few scratches. : .
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1) To drink rapidly; drain. He tossed off two drinks and left. 2) To make or say easily without trying or thinking hard. She tossed off smart remarks all during dinner. He thinks a reporter should be able to toss off an article every few hours.
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или With that meaning. She said she hated spinach, or words to that effect. When I leave, I will write you to that effect so you will know.
As far as you know; to the extent of your knowledge. He has never won a game, to the best of my knowledge. To the best of my knowledge he is a college man, but I may be mistaken.
To the point of completion or conclusion. — Used especially of a very painful or unpleasant task or experience. Although Mrs. Smith was bored by the lecture, she stayed to the bitter end. They knew the war would be lost, but the men fought to the bitter end.
, Thoroughly, entirely, to the core, through all layers. I am dreadfully tired; I've worked my fingers to the bone. : .
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или With an opposite result or effect; just the opposite; in disagreement; saying the opposite. Although Bill was going to the movies, he told Joe to the contrary. We will expect you for dinner unless we get word to the contrary. School gossip to the contrary, Mary is not engaged to be married. : .
With the meaning or purpose; to say that. He made a speech to the effect that we would all keep our jobs even if the factory were sold. The new governor would do his best in the office to which he had been elected.
As it is seen; as a person or thing first seems; apparently. That girl looks to the eye like a nice girl to know, but she is really rather mean. That suit appears to the eye to be a good buy, but it may not be. : .
или Into leadership; out into notice or view; forward. The hidden skill of the lawyer came to the fore during the trial. In the progress of the war some new leaders came to the fore.
Very much; fully. The campers enjoyed their trip to the full. We appreciated to the full the teacher's help. : .
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On the side of profit or advantage; in one's favor; to one's benefit; ahead. After I sold my stamp collection, I was ten dollars to the good. The teacher did not see him come in late, which was all to the good.
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или To the limit; as far as possible; completely. The other boys on the team told Tom he couldn't quit. They said, "You're in this to the hilt." The Smith's house is mortgaged up to the hilt. : .
или Perfectly; just as anyone could want it; very satisfactorily. The rooms in her new home were painted and decorated to the queen's taste. The soldiers dressed and marched to the king's taste.
With nothing done wrong or left undone; exactly; precisely. He carried out his orders to the letter. When writing a test you should follow the instructions to the letter. : .
At ease with something because of lifelong familiarity with it. She says her English is the best because she is to the manner born.
To the greatest degree possible; extremely; very much so. Scales must be accurate to the nth degree. His choice of words was exactly to the nth degree.
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, To the amount or extent of; in the amount of. He had to pay to the tune of fifty dollars for seeing how fast the car would go. When she left the race track she had profited to the tune of ten dollars.
Into a place from which there is no escape; into a trap or corner. — Usually used after "drive" or a similar word. John's failing the last test drove him to the wall. The score was 12-12 in the last minute of play, but a touchdown forced the visitors to the wall. Bill had to sell his five Great Danes. The high cost of feeding them was driving him to the wall.
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Very dangerous or uncertain in situation. Our team won the game, all right, but it was touch and go for a while. At one time while they were climbing the cliff it was touch and go whether they could do it.
To confer or consult with one. Before we make a decision, I'd like to touch base with our financial department.
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1) To cause to fire or explode by lighting the priming or the fuse. The boy touched off a firecracker. : . 2) To start something as if by lighting a fuse. The coach's resignation touched off a quarrel. : .
или To speak of or write of briefly. The speaker touched on several other subjects in the course of his talk but mostly kept himself to the main topic. : .
To hurt someone's feelings very deeply; offend. His remark about her lack of education touched her to the quick.
1) A small repair; a small amount of paint. Just a small touchup here and there and your novel may be publishable. 2) Redoing the color of one's hair. My roots are showing; I need a touchup.
1) To paint over (small imperfections.) I want to touch up that scratch on the fender. The woodwork is done, but there are a few places he has to touch up. 2) To improve with small additions or changes. He touched up the photographic negative to make a sharper print. It's a good speech, but it needs a little touching up. 3) To talk into lending; wheedle from. He touched George up for five bucks.
A speech, performance, or activity of such superior quality that the person next in line feels and thinks that it would be very difficult to match it in quality. Sir Lawrence Olivier's performance of Hamlet was a tough act to follow in every sense.
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, A man who is very individualistic and, as a result, highly successful with women. Joe is a real tough cat, man.
An extremely determined, hardheaded person, or someone with whom it is unusually difficult to deal. Marjorie is a very pretty girl, but when it comes to business she sure is one tough cookie.
To live through and endure a trying situation. The tourists got lost in the desert without a compass, and they had to tough it out for three days on a single bottle of water.
An informal way to say that one had that coming; it serves one right. So your date didn't show up, eh? Tough luck, fellow.
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Someone who is strong, helpful, and sympathetic, and can always be relied on in times of trouble. John was a veritable tower of strength to our family while my father was in the war and my mother lay ill in the hospital.
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The residents of a college town and the students and teachers of the college. The senator made a speech attended by both town and gown. There were fights between town and gown.
или To consider an idea or an offer periodically without coming to a decision. He was toying with the idea of accepting the company's offer of the vice presidency in Tokyo, but he was unable to decide.
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To find by or as if by following tracks or a trail. The hunters tracked down game in the forest. She spent weeks in the library tracking the reference down in all their hooks on the subject. : .
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To give something to a seller as part payment for another thing of greater value. The Browns traded their old car in on a new one. : .
Something given as part payment on something better. The dealer took our old car as a trade-in. — Often used like an adjective. We cleaned up the car at trade-in time.
To use as a way of helping yourself. The coach traded on the pitcher's weakness for left-handed batters by using all his southpaws. The senator's son traded on his father's name when he ran for mayor.
One of the stamps that you get (as from a store or gas station) because you buy something there; a stamp you get with a purchase and save in special books until you have enough to take to a special store and trade for something you want. Mother always buys things in stores where they give trading stamps.
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To travel with very little luggage or with very little to carry. Plane passengers must travel light. Tom and Fred traveled light on their camping trip.
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To keep the head above water with the body in an upright position by moving the feet as if walking. He kept afloat by treading water.
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A way of solving problems by trying different possible solutions until you find one that works. John found the short circuit by trial and error. The only way Tom could solve the algebra problem was by the method of trial and error.
A hint about a plan of action that is given out to find out what people will say. John mentioned the class presidency to Bill as a trial balloon to see if Bill might be interested in running. The editorial was a trial balloon to test the public's reaction to a change in the school day.
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, , 1. A piece of expert knowledge; a smart, quick, or skillful way of working at a trade or job. Mr. Olson spent years learning the tricks of the trade as a carpenter. Any one can learn how to hang wallpaper, but only an expert can show you the tricks of the trade. 2. A smart and sometimes tricky or dishonest way of doing something in order to succeed or win. The champion knows all the tricks of the boxing trade; he knows many ways to hurt his opponent and to get him mixed up.
The custom of going from house to house on Halloween asking for small gifts and playing tricks on people who refuse to give. When Mrs. Jones answered the doorbell, the children yelled "Trick or treat." Mrs. Jones gave them all some candy. On Halloween Bill and Tom went out playing trick or treat.
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A football player who is able to pass, kick, and run all very well. The triple threat halfback was the star of the team.
, Incoherent, confused, faulty of speech, illogical; as if under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It was hard to make sense of anything Fred said yesterday, he sounded so tripped out. : .
1) To make (someone) unsteady on the feet; cause to miss a step, stumble, or fall. A root tripped Billy up while he was running in the woods, and he fell and hurt his ankle. 2) To cause (someone) to make a mistake. The teacher asked tricky questions in the test to trip up students who were not alert.
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To bring out for inspection; display. Don't mention compact disks to Joe, or he'll trot out his entire collection and we'll be stuck here all night.
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Something kept back to be used to win success if nothing else works. The coach saved his star pitcher for a trump card. Mary had several ways to get Joan to come to her party. Her trump card was that the football captain would be there.
To make up (something untrue); invent in the mind. Every time Tom is late getting home he trumps up some new excuse. The Russians were afraid he was a spy, so they arrested him on a trumped-up charge and made him leave the country.
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To put (clothing) on to see if it fits. She tried on several pairs of shoes before she found one she liked. The clerk told him to try the coat on.
To make an inexperienced attempt (at something unfamiliar.) I thought I would try my hand at bowling, although I had never bowled before.
To try out a recently acquired ability. Marjorie just had her twelfth French lesson and wants to try her wings by speaking with our visitors from Paris.
An audience at a theater or opera for would-be actors and singers. The Civic Opera is holding tryouts throughout all of next week. Maybe I'll go and see if I can sing in the chorus.
1) To test by trial or by experimenting. He tried golf out to see if he would like it. The scientists tried out thousands of chemicals before they found the right one. The coach wants to try the new play out in the first game. 2) To try for a place on a team or in a group. Tom tried out for the basketball team. Shirley will try out for the lead in the play. : .
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To place the covers carefully around the person (usually a child) in bed. When I was a child, my mother used to tuck me into bed every night.
1) A game in which two teams pull on opposite ends of a rope, trying to pull the other team over a line marked on the ground. The tug-of-war ended when both teams tumbled in a heap. 2) A contest in which two sides try to defeat each other; struggle. A tug-of-war developed between the boys who wanted to go fishing and those who wanted to go hiking. Betty felt a tug-of-war between her wish to go to the movies and her realizing she had to do her homework. The tug of war between the union men and management ended in a long strike.
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To adjust a radio or television set to pick up a certain station. Bob tuned in his portable radio to a record show. Tom tuned in to Channel 11 to hear the news.
To not listen to something. "How can you work in such a noisy environment?" Jane asked Sue. "Well, I simply tune it out," she answered.
1a) To adjust (a musical instrument) to make the right sound. Before he began to play, Harry tuned up his banjo. 1b) To adjust a musical instrument or a group of musical instruments to the right sound. The orchestra came in and began to tune up for the concert. 2) To adjust many parts of (car engine) which must work together so that it will run properly. He took his car to the garage to have the engine tuned up.
1) The adjusting or fixing of something (as a motor) to make it work safely and well. Father says the car needs a tune-up before winter begins. 2) Exercise or practicing for the purpose of getting ready; a trial before something. The team went to the practice field for their last tune-up before the game tomorrow. : .
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To pretend not to see; not pay attention. The corrupt police chief turned a blind eye to the open gambling in the town. Bob turned a blind eye to the "No Fishing" sign. : .
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To pretend not to hear; refuse to hear; not pay attention. Mary turned a deaf ear to Lois's asking to ride her bicycle. The teacher turned a deaf ear to Bob's excuse. : .
To do anything to help. — Usually used in the negative. When we were all hurrying to get the house ready for company, Mary sat reading and wouldn't turn a hand. : .
To realize a good profit. Tom turned an honest penny in the soybean trading business. : .
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To become a different color. In the fall the leaves turn color. When the dye was added the solution turned color.
1) To reduce the loudness, brightness, or force of. The theater lights were turned down. Turn down that radio, will you? The hose was throwing too much water so I turned down the water a little bit. 2) To refuse to accept; reject. His request for a raise was turned down. If she offers to help, I'll turn her down. Many boys courted Lynn, but she turned them all down.
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1) or To give to someone; deliver to someone. I want you to turn in a good history paper. When the football season was over, we turned in our uniforms. 2) To inform on; report. She turned them in to the police for breaking the street light. 3) To give in return for something. They turned in their old money for new. We turned our car in on a new model. : . 4) To go to bed. We were tired, so we turned in about nine o'clock. : .
или To be so grieved or angry that you would not rest quietly in your grave. If your grandfather could see what you're doing now, he would turn over in his grave.
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1) To stop by turning a knob or handle or by working a switch; to cause to be off. He turned the water off. He turned off the light. 2) To leave by turning right or left onto another way. Turn off the highway at exit 5) The car turned off on Bridge Street. 3) To disgust, bore, or repel (someone) by being intellectually, emotionally, socially, or sexually unattractive. I won't date Linda Bell anymore — she just turns me off. : .
The time at the end of one century and the beginning of the next century; : The time when the 1800's became the 1900's; the early 1900's. Automobiles were strange things to see at the turn of the century.
1) To start by turning a knob or handle or working a switch; cause to be on. Jack turned on the water. Who turned the lights on? 2) To put forth or succeed with as easily as turning on water. She really turns on the charm when that new boy is around. 3) To attack. The lion tamer was afraid the lions would turn on him. After Joe fumbled the ball and lost the big game, his friends turned on him. 4) The opposite of turning someone off; to become greatly interested in an idea, person, or undertaking; to arouse the senses pleasantly. Mozart's music always turns me on. 5) Introducing someone to a new experience, or set of values. Benjamin turned me on to transcendental meditation, and ever since I've been feeling great! : .
To be able to turn in a very narrow spot comparable to a small coin. This new sports car can turn on a dime.
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To refuse to help (someone in trouble or need.) He turned his back on his own family when they needed help. The poorer nations are often not grateful for our help, but still we can not turn our back on them. : .
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, To make you lose your good judgment. The first pretty girl he saw turned his head. Winning the class election turned his head.
To scorn; snub; look down at somebody or something. I don't understand why Sue has to turn her nose up at everyone who didn't go to an Ivy League college.
, To make you feel sick. The smell of that cigar was enough to turn your stomach. The sight of blood turns my stomach.
To turn around suddenly. When John saw Fred approaching him, he turned on his heel. When little Tommy's big brother showed up, the bully turned on his heel.
The number of people in attendance at a gathering. This is a terrific turnout for Tim's poetry reading.
1) To make leave or go away. His father turned him out of the house. If you don't behave, you will be turned out. : . 2) To turn inside out; empty. He turned out his pockets looking for the money. Robbers turned out all the drawers in the house in a search for jewels. 3) To make; produce. The printing press turns out a thousand books an hour. Sally can turn out a cake in no time. Martin turns out a poem each week for the school paper. 4) To get out of bed. At camp the boys had to turn out early and go to bed early too. : . 5) To come or go out to see or do something. Everybody turned out for the big parade. Many boys turned out for football practice. : . 6) To prove to be; be in the end; be found to be. The noise turned out to be just the dog scratching at the door. Her guess turned out to be right. Everything turned out all right. 7) To make (a light) go out. Please turn out the lights. : .
1) The proportion of expenditure and income realized in a business; the volume of traffic in a business. Our turnover is so great that in two short years we tripled our original investment and are expanding at a great rate. 2) Triangular baked pastry filled with some fruit. John's favorite dessert is apple turnovers. 3) The number of employees coming and going in a company. The boss is so strict in our office that the turnover in personnel is very large.
1) To roll, tip, or turn from one side to the other; overturn; upset. He's going to turn over the page. The bike hit a rock and turned over. 2, To think about carefully; to consider. He turned the problem over in his mind for three days before he did anything about it. 3) To give to someone for use or care. I turned my library books over to the librarian. Mrs. Jackson brought her boy to the school and turned him over to the housefather. Bob turns over most of the money he earns to his mother. 4) Of an engine or motor; to start. The battery is dead and the motor won't turn over. 5a) To buy and then sell to customers. The store turned over $5,000 worth of skiing equipment in January. 5b) To be bought in large enough amounts; sell. In a shoe store, shoes of medium width turn over quickly, because many people wear that size, but a pair of narrow shoes may not be sold for years.
To start afresh; to have a new beginning. "Don't be sad, Jane," Sue said. "A divorce is not the end of the world. Just turn over a new leaf and you will soon be happy again." : .
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To carefully consider. I will have to turn it over in my mind whether to accept the new job offer from Japan.
, To run away from trouble or danger. When the bully saw my big brother, he turned tail and ran.
To return to an earlier period. Mother wished she could turn the clock back to the days before the children grew up and left home. Will repealing the minimum wage for workers under age eighteen turn the clock back to the abuses of the last century?
To let someone do something to you and not to do it in return; not hit back when hit; be patient when injured or insulted by someone; not try to get even. Joe turned the other cheek when he was hit with a snowball.
To affect the balance in favor of one party or group against the other. It could well be that the speech he made turned the scales in their favor.
To make something happen just the opposite of how it is supposed to happen. The boys turned the tables on John when they took his squirt gun away and squirted him.
To change what looks like defeat into victory. We were losing the game until Jack got there. His coming turned the tide for us, and we won. : .
, To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn't quite turn the trick. : .
To disapprove or reject; say no. — Usually used with "on". The company turned thumbs down on Mr. Smith's sales plan. The men turned thumbs down on a strike at that time.
To begin working with much energy. All the boys turned to and cleaned the cabin in a few minutes. Mary turned to and studied for the test. : .
To turn upside down. The car skidded on the ice and turned turtle.
1) To find; discover. The police searched the house hoping to turn up more clues. 2) To appear or be found suddenly or unexpectedly. The missing boy turned up an hour later. A man without training works at whatever jobs turn up. : .
To refuse as not being good enough for you. He thinks he should only get steak, and he turns up his nose at hamburger.
, To die. One morning the children found that their pet mouse had turned up his toes, so they had a funeral for him. : .
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, Used to express mild disapproval. "Tut-tut," said the teacher. "You shouldn't cross the street without looking." Tut-tut, put that piece of candy back. You've already had three pieces.
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To do nothing; be idle. I'd rather work than stand around here twiddling my thumbs.
также или To have complete control over; to be able to make (someone) do anything you want. Sue can twist any of the boys around her little finger. : .
, To force someone; threaten someone to make him do something. — Usually used jokingly. Will you dance with the prettiest girl in school? Stop, you're twisting my arm! I had to twist Tom's arm to make him eat the candy!
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, Twenty-five cents; a quarter of a dollar. A haircut only cost two bits when Grandfather was young. : .
, 1) Something not important or very small; almost nothing. Paul was so angry that he said for two cents he would quit the team. When John saw that the girl he was scolding was lame, he felt like two cents. 2) or Something you want to say; opinion. — Used with a possessive. The boys were talking about baseball, and Harry put in his two cents worth, even though he didn't know much about baseball. If we want your two cents, we'll ask for it.
Insincere; disloyal; deceitful. Don't confide too much in him as he has the reputation of being two-faced. : .
An informal way to express a situation when two people desire privacy and a third one is present. — A proverb. Beth and Carl wanted to be alone so when Maggie joined them they said, "Two's company; three's a crowd."
-From baseball. Two opportunities wasted in some undertaking, so that only one chance is left. Poor John has two strikes against him when it comes to his love for Frances: first, he is too fat, and, second, he is bald.
, To go out with a second boy or girlfriend and keep it a secret from the first. Joan was two-timing Jim with Fred. Mary cried when she found that Joe was two-timing her. : .
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По-английски
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yard sale



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wake up



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vacant lot



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ugly duckling



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take a look....



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safe and....